Humanistic Therapy

Humanistic and Person-Centered Therapy is a therapeutic approach strongly influenced by Carl Rogers, whose person-centered or client-centered perspective focused on the patient’s ability for self-direction and understanding in personality development.


UNCONDITIONAL POSITIVE REGARD IS AT THE HEART OF THE THERAPEUTIC RELATIONSHIP. I APPROACH THERAPY WITH THE INHERENT UNDERSTANDING AND BELIEF THAT MY PATIENTS HAVE THE ABILITY TO DIRECT THEIR OWN LIVES AND THE POTENTIAL TO ACHIEVE THEIR OWN GOALS.

[COMFORT SHIELDS]


Much like Stolorow’s therapeutic comportment model, Rogers’ approach is nonjudgmental and empathic. Active listening, warmth, acceptance, and the client-therapist relationship are all paramount to the success of humanistic therapy. A main goal of humanistic therapy is to allow patients to develop a stronger and healthier sense of self and to “self-actualise” or “become” one’s potentialities.

Humanistic psychotherapy is less based on the medical model or pathology and focuses instead on the healthy aspects of a person’s life. It is a science of human experience, valuing the actual lived experience of the client rather than any goals that a therapist may bring to the work. The therapist’s role, instead, is to provide empathy and a relationship based on respect and trust through active listening and support for the client to steer the therapy work.